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There’s now ice-cream that doesn’t melt—would you try it?

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There’s now ice-cream that doesn’t melt—would you try it?
The Japanese made non-melting ice-cream; is the Earth still round?

Trust the Japanese to come up with the wackiest new inventions. From gadgets like standing tripods with chin-rests for a snooze during your commute, to the answer for the most trivial of needs such as plastic cases for solitary bananas (Bye bye, bruised bananas!), they have thought of it all. Or so you'd think.

 

This latest discovery challenges the laws of nature so much so that it's making cube-shaped watermelon look square. And believe it or not, the creation of Kanazawa Ice's popsicles that do not melt was but a happy accident.

 

 

It started when scientists at Japan's Biotherapy Development Research Center in Kanazawa City enlisted the help of a pastry chef to experiment with ways of using an extract from strawberries called polyphenol in hopes of helping strawberry farmers affected by natural disaster. 

 

After some confusion over batches of solidified dairy cream, it was found that "polyphenol liquid has properties to make it difficult for water and oil to separate." Tomihisa Ota, a professor emeritus of pharmacy at Kanazawa University soon developed non-melting popsicles using polyphenol. "A popsicle containing it will be able to retain the original shape of the cream for a longer time than usual and be hard to melt."

 

It sure sounds like something we need to see to believe. So, watch:

 

 

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