Say pink and breast cancer awareness, Barbie doll boxes and tulle ballerina skirts spring to mind. Well, it is no surprise why—after all, the colour pink is assigned to be the "fairer" sex upon birth and has always been attributed with girly-ness. There was once a time where wearing pink is synonymous to being demure and conventional. However, in recent years, the colour is all grown up. In an era of feminism, pink is unapologetic, frank and boldly present. Just recently, crowds of women donned pink "pussyhats" in a show of empowerment and a stand against President Donald Trump. It was not just for women's rights, they voiced support for immigrants' rights, health care, Black Lives Matter and education, amongst other causes. Pink is a symbol of power.


On the other side of the pink spectrum, a progressive take on the colour has also emerged, dubbed as "millennial pink". You have seen this colour explosion all over Tumblr, beauty product packaging like Glossier and in pretty flatlays on Pinterest-it is the pink that is, well, not exactly pink. Unlike the oversaturated pink we have known for decades, the colour varies from a salmon shade to soft blush nudes. Otherwise, you may recognise the dusty pink colour, 'Rose Quartz' as Pantone's colour of the year for 2016. The diffusion of this colour in pop culture is apparent: Lady Gaga flaunts it on the cover of her newest album, Joanne, Solange dons it all throughout her video for 'Cranes in the Sky' and transgender model, Hari Nef cloaked in the colour on the cover of Globe Magazine. 


Besides the fact that pink is the colour to rock in 2017, the colour is no longer a ladylike cliché and shapes a girl power revolution. Hence, all the more reasons to wear the colour on International Women's Day, or any other day for that matter. We look to the streets for style inspiration, so go ahead and scroll through our gallery and gain some ideas on how you can wear the colour pink with pride (and in style):